Airport Under the Microscope

One of Hartford’s treasures, the Hartford-Brainard Airport (Brainard), is under the microscope of local politicians, as the latest stopgap measure to fix the City of Hartford’s financial problems.  In theory, so some politicians believe, the land is prime real estate, ideally situated near the highway and the Connecticut River for development.  This short sighted view has no basis in reality.

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The Drone Regulations Are Here!

            On June 21, 2016, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued its final regulations concerning the operation of drones or small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS).  The regulations adopt many of the provisional rules previously in effect.  Importantly, for commercial operations, there are provisions for the certification of a Remote Pilot in Command (without the requirement that this person previously hold a pilot certification).  The Remote Pilot in Command is a new license issued by the FAA.  The rules go into effect on August 29, 2016.

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Drones: Staying In Compliance!

The advancement in global positioning systems (GPS), coupled with micro-electronics, has given the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) more than a few headaches when it comes to ensuring the public’s safety from drones, or in FAA parlance, Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS).  On April 18, 2016, CNN reported a suspected drone strike against a passenger jet in London, England.[1]  Luckily, no one was injured and the plane was able to land without damage.  The strike, whether unintentional or intentional, raises a lot of concerns.  This article will address the regulatory framework for the operation of UAS in the United States.

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Airline Seating – Should Airlines Be Held Accountable For Passenger Health-Related Injuries?

You can imagine the advisement late one night on T.V.: “Did you or a loved one recently suffer from deep vein thrombosis or a pulmonary embolism after a long flight?  If so, call the law offices of . . .”

Implausible?  Far-fetched?  Consider that the associated risks of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and/or a pulmonary embolism with long periods of confined seating have been known for decades.  The airlines are acutely aware of this risk, understand that exercise and movement mitigate its potential impact, and yet continue to reduce seat size and pack the cabin like an overstuffed cattle wagon.  Little is done to brief the passengers on this danger or to provide enough leg room so that the passenger can undertake the recommended exercises to avoid this health concern.

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The 1500-Hour Rule - Is America at a Disadvantage?

On a bleak winter evening, on February 12, 2009 at about 10:17 p.m., Continental Connection Flight 3407 (operated by Colgan Air, Inc.) crashed while on final approach into Buffalo, New York.  The repercussions from this crash had a transformative impact on pilot experience requirements for air carriers as well as on aviation training.  The end result was a requirement that any pilot operating as a first officer with an air carrier would need to have a minimum of 1500 hours of total flight experience, significantly increasing the prior required flight hours from 250 hours. 

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